Sewist pattern drafting language

Sewist CAD is unlike graphic pattern drafting softwares you might have worked in.

The main idea of the software is that it is parametric and provides auto grading into multiple sizes with a click of a mouse. This concept has been hugely popular on our website Lekala, that offers made-to-measure sewing patterns.

That is why you don't just draw on the grid, but explain to the software how you want the things to be drafted.
Once you code it, it will diligently repeat all the steps for other sizes, other gender groups, no matter how complex your pattern is.


  • You may create anything - garments, upholstery, shoes - and design these as you like. You are not limited with pre-set templates. 
  • You may create your own basic blocks based on the pattern construction methods that you trust, and save them as templates.
  • You may access a library of pre-created templates for slopers, sleeves, collars, etc, and use them as part of your project.
  • You may grade your patterns with a click of a mouse for a vast range of heights and sizes.
  • You may grade it to a set of individual size measurements, even if they are in between the sizes.
  • You may export your patterns to various formats. The first release offers export to PDF, and we shall add DXF and other formats later on.

  • Sewist CAD uses a special pattern scenario language, that is tuned to the needs of a pattern designer. We have kept it as simple and intuitive as possible, and yet it allows you to create projects of whatever complexity.

    We recommend that you learn the basics of Sewist CAD scenario language. If you ever coded before, you may jump to Documentation of the language. Otherwise we recommend you follow this Manual, as we will be explaining things in detail here. You may also choose to subscribe to our YouTube channel with video lessons and pattern drafting demonstrations.

    Have a look at these, or follow along with us, as we dive into creating your own pattern!

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